The pipwerks forum is dead, long live the new eLearning Technology and Development Google Group!

I’d like to say thank you to all the people who posted in the pipwerks forum, and invite you to join me in the new eLearning Technology and Development group.

I’d also like to ask anyone and everyone who develops e-learning to drop by and sign up for the eLearning Technology and Development group. Ask questions — lots of questions — and let’s see if we can get a good community going!

Lines in the sand

Being an idealist, I eagerly bought into what was being covered in grad school. I believed (and still do, to a point) that every project should follow ADDIE or a similar model. C’mon, it makes sense, doesn’t it? The line in the sand had been drawn: skip these principles at your own peril. Now that I’ve spent a few years working full-time as an instructional designer-slash-e-learning developer, I’ve learned first-hand that the instructional design ideals taught in grad school are quickly thrown out the window when you get a “real” job.

Development standards for e-learning… a starting point

Understanding that we should be using standards and best practices throughout e-learning development, the question becomes “what standards and best practices should we follow?”

Here’s my attempt at outlining some basics.

I’m 100% positive I’ve missed a few things, and I’m pretty sure not everyone will agree with my statements. Why not join in and add your two cents?

Rapid Intake: Where are the standards?

Today Rapid Intake announced a new service named Unison. Out of curiosity, I perused the Rapid Intake site to read more about Unison. […] I certainly don’t mean to beat up on whoever designed their site, but as a company whose business is publishing web-based documents, this website gives me zero confidence in the quality of their product.

Building e-learning courses: Should we use e-learning authoring tools?

Buckle your seatbelts, you may not like this statement: Most e-learning tools do not promote the creation of effective courses, do not promote web standards, and do not promote accessibility; they merely make cookie-cutter course development easier for technically inexperienced course developers.

There, I’ve said it. Please don’t hate me.

I hate to say it…

But I found another Microsoft product helpful today. It pains me to say it, but it’s true. I have created an XML template for an online course delivery system I’m building at my workplace. The course data for each course needs to be placed into a copy of this XML template. The problem is that … Continue reading “I hate to say it…”

Daily newness: An online XML-to-XSD Converter

OK, most of you probably don’t know the difference between an XML file and an XSD (“XML Schema”) file. For a brief intro check out W3Schools’ XML Schema tutorial. A brief quote: “The purpose of an XML Schema is to define the legal building blocks of an XML document, just like a DTD.” This week … Continue reading “Daily newness: An online XML-to-XSD Converter”