HTML5 Video, minus Ogg

As you’ve probably read somewhere on the interwebs, HTML5 is bringing native video support to browsers. This will enable us to embed a video file directly in our HTML, much like a SWF or image.

Background

You may have also heard that there’s currently a big controversy over what kind of video files will be supported. The defacto standard is MP4/H.264, which is used by Adobe in their Flash video format, and by huge media sites like YouTube. Mozilla, the makers of Firefox, refuse to support the MP4/H.264 standard because it isn’t open-source and free from licensing constraints.

Turns out H.264 is not public domain. Although the company that owns the H.264 patent has temporarily agreed to waive royalty fees for the next decade or so, they reserve the right to charge fees later on. Mozilla says no way, we will only support a video format that is free from licensing issues and has no patent holders (because patent holders can decide to sue some day). Mozilla supports the completely free/open-source Ogg format.

Apple and Adobe, already knee-deep in MP4/H.264 with their Quicktime and Flash video products, vow to press on with H.264.  Google also supports H.264 because YouTube relies on it, and because Google’s new Chrome browser is based on the WebKit project, which has Apple as a main code contributor. In case you haven’t noticed, Apple, Adobe and Google have pretty much cornered the internet video market the past few years, so if they’re throwing their support behind H.264, you can count on it being around for a while. Not to mention that many mobile devices, including the iPhone and most Android phones, have hardware that is designed specifically to support H.264 video, enabling smoother playback and less battery drain than non-dedicated hardware.

(For what it’s worth, Opera is in agreement with Mozilla and supports Ogg. However, not many people seem to pay attention to Opera these days, so they don’t appear to have much influence in this race. Microsoft has endorsed H.264 with it’s upcoming IE9 browser, but it won’t be available for some time.)

The problem

Firefox and Opera are essentially forcing websites to offer two versions of each video: an Ogg version and an MP4 version. In my opinion — and the opinion of many others — this simply will not do. Providing two different video files is not realistic, Ogg’s quality is inferior to H.264, and many computers and mobile devices have direct hardware support for H.264 but not Ogg. In reality, without MP4 support, HTML5 video is rendered useless for most site developers in Firefox and Opera.

The most logical workaround is to code <video> elements to work for MP4 and have a Flash Player-based fallback for older browsers and browsers that only support Ogg. Since the <video> element is designed to allow for fallback content, just like the <object> element, we can do this:


<video id="myvideo" width="480" height="360" controls>
    <source src="/video/file.m4v" type="video/mp4"></source>
    <object data="flash-video-player.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="480" height="360">  
        <param value="flash-video-player.swf" name="movie"/>  
        <param value="file=/video/file.m4v" name="flashvars"/>
    </object>
</video>

This works fine in Safari, Chrome, Internet Explorer and older versions of Firefox and Opera that don’t support the <video> element. However, Firefox 3.6 and Opera 10.5 do something very irritating: even though they KNOW their <video> doesn’t support “video/MP4”, they load the <video> element anyway. Which is … like … OMG so duh … because the video can’t possibly play!

If the <video> element is loaded, Firefox and Opera will never load the fallback <object> containing the Flash-based fallback.

Because this behavior cannot be fixed with markup, we’re forced find a scripted workaround (notice that we haven’t used a single bit of JavaScript yet). Thankfully, there’s a pretty straightforward solution: Delete the <video> element in Firefox and Opera.

A Solution

Here’s a simple script that will detect whether HTML 5 video is supported, and if it is, will check to see if MP4 is supported. If HTML5 video is supported but MP4 is NOT supported, the script deletes the specified <video> element but leaves the Flash fallback in its place.


var detectVideoSupport = function (){
    var detect = document.createElement('video') || false;
    this.html5 = detect && typeof detect.canPlayType !== "undefined";
    this.mp4 = this.html5 && (detect.canPlayType("video/mp4") === "maybe" || detect.canPlayType("video/mp4") === "probably");
    this.ogg = this.html5 && (detect.canPlayType("video/ogg") === "maybe" || detect.canPlayType("video/ogg") === "probably");
    return this;
};

var replaceVideoWithObject = function (video_id){    
    if(!video_id){ return false; }
    var video = document.getElementById(video_id);
    if(video){
        var obj = video.getElementsByTagName("object")[0];
        if(obj){
            var obj_copy = obj.cloneNode(true);
            video.parentNode.insertBefore(obj_copy, video);
            video.parentNode.removeChild(video);
        }
    }
};

window.onload = function (){
    var video = detectVideoSupport();
    //Both Opera and Firefox support OGG but lack MP4 support
    if(video.ogg && !video.mp4){
        replaceVideoWithObject("myvideo");
    }
};
</script>

Functioning demo.

A few notes

Tested successfully in:

  • Windows XP: Firefox 3.0, Firefox 3.5.8, Internet Explorer 6, Internet Explorer 8, Google Chrome 4.1.2
  • Windows Vista: Internet Explorer 7
  • Mac OS X (10.6): Firefox 3.6, Safari 4.01, Chrome 5 (beta), Opera 10.1, Opera 10.5b

(Note: IE6, IE7 & IE8 give an unexplained “object required” error in the demo page, but everything works fine. I will investigate as time permits.)

This demo uses the JW Media Player as the Flash fallback video player, but you can use any Flash-based video player on your page.

This demo doesn’t do any Flash Player version detection to ensure the visitor has a supported version of Flash Player. If you need to add Flash Player version detection, you can use SWFObject to embed your Flash file.

Update April 3, 2010: This post was updated to add Opera 10.5 to the list of non-behaving browsers and remove Firefox user agent sniffing.

Rule of Thirds tutorial

By popular demand, I’m re-posting the Rule of Thirds tutorial.
I took it down when I revamped my site, largely because the tutorial is old and requires Shockwave. A few school teachers have let me know they used it in their classes, so I’m happy to repost it.

Rule of Thirds
Launch the Rule of Thirds tutorial
Also available: Standalone .exe version (Windows only)

Background: Rule of Thirds is quick and fun tutorial explaining the concept of the rule of thirds as used in visual design. I created this tutorial for a graduate-level Macromedia Director course at San Francisco State University in 2004. Because it was created in Macromedia Director, you’ll need the Shockwave plug-in to view the file (sorry about that… I know it’s a hassle).

Some materials contained in project (music, images) are owned by others. This was a non-profit educational project that respects their rights and has made use of their materials only for fair-use demonstration purposes. All other materials © Philip Hutchison 2004.

A new removeClasses utility for MooTools

Note: If you want to skip to the final code (in both MooTools and framework-neutral flavors), it’s at the bottom of this post.

The problem

Readers of this blog know that I enjoy MooTools. Like other JavaScript frameworks, it has many excellent features, including addClass and removeClass functions, which I use all the time. However, when I was working on my CustomInput class the other day, I discovered a major shortcoming of MooTools’ removeClass function — it doesn’t work very well when trying to remove multiple classes (as of MooTools version 1.2.4). In particular, if you specify multiple classes to remove, removeClass will only work if the classes are listed in that element’s className property in the order specified.


//Assuming element has className "hello cruel world"

//Single terms work fine
element.removeClass("world"); //becomes "hello  world"
element.removeClass("hello"); //becomes " cruel world"

//Multiple terms listed in same order as className works fine
element.removeClass("hello cruel"); //becomes " world"

//Multiple terms NOT listed in same order as className fail
element.removeClass("hello world"); //remains "hello cruel world"
element.removeClass("cruel hello"); //remains "hello cruel world"

The cause

A peek at MooTools’ removeClass code reveals the shortcoming:


removeClass: function(className){
   this.className = this.className.replace(new RegExp('(^|\s)' + className + '(?:\s|$)'), '$1');
   return this;
}

The string containing the class names you want to remove is passed as-is; it remains a whole string, and is not broken down into substrings. So "hello world" remains the single string "hello world" instead of two separate strings "hello" and "world".

I tested jQuery’s removeClass function and noticed it doesn’t have the same problem; it will remove each word, no matter what order you specify. Taking a look under the hood reveals a completely different approach to removeClass:


removeClass: function( value ) {
   if ( jQuery.isFunction(value) ) {
      return this.each(function(i) {
         var self = jQuery(this);
         self.removeClass( value.call(this, i, self.attr("class")) );
      });
   }

   if ( (value && typeof value === "string") || value === undefined ) {
      var classNames = (value || "").split(rspace);

      for ( var i = 0, l = this.length; i < l; i++ ) {
         var elem = this[i];

         if ( elem.nodeType === 1 && elem.className ) {
            if ( value ) {
               var className = (" " + elem.className + " ").replace(rclass, " ");
               for ( var c = 0, cl = classNames.length; c < cl; c++ ) {
                  className = className.replace(" " + classNames[c] + " ", " ");
               }
               elem.className = jQuery.trim( className );

            } else {
               elem.className = "";
            }
         }
      }
   }

   return this;
}

The big difference between jQuery and MooTools in this case is that jQuery converts the arguments to an array (split using spaces as a delimiter) then loops through the className property to search for each word in the array, whereas MooTools performs a simple full-string replace using regular expressions.

The search for a solution

My first reaction was to build a MooTools-flavored variation of jQuery’s removeClass code.


Element.implement({
   removeClasses: function (classNames) {
      if(this.className){
         var classNameString = this.className;
         classNames.split(/s+/).each(function (term){
            classNameString = classNameString.replace(term, " ");
         });
         this.className = classNameString.clean();
      }
      return this;
   }
});

It follows the same basic principles of the jQuery version, but uses MooTools’ Array.each and String.clean utility functions. It works well, but I wasn’t thrilled about using a loop. I thought maybe a regular expression would be better suited for the job.

I eventually came up with this:
(purposely verbose to explain what’s happening)


Element.implement({
   removeClasses: function (classNames) {
      if(classNames && this.className){
         //Replace all spaces in classNames with vertical beams
         var terms = classNames.replace(/s+/g, "|");
         //Create a regular expression using terms variable
         var reg = new RegExp('\b(' + terms + ')\b', 'g');
         //Use the new regular expression to replace all specified terms with a space
         var newClass = this.className.replace(reg, " ");
         //Use MooTools' 'clean' method to remove extraneous spaces
         newClass = newClass.clean();
         //Set element's classname to new cleaned list of classes
         this.className = newClass;
      }
      return this;
   }
});
Notes:

  • I’m no expert on JavaScript speed tests, so for all I know a loop might be quicker. However, a regular expression feels more elegant.
  • I named my utility removesClasses so it doesn’t overwrite MooTools’ built-in utility.

Final MooTools version

Here’s a more concise version:


Element.implement({
   removeClasses: function (classNames) {
      this.className = this.className.replace(new RegExp("\b(" + classNames.replace(/s+/g, "|") + ")\b", "g"), " ").clean();
      return this;
   }
});

You can see it in action via the MooShell (apparently the MooTools Shell is no longer online)

Standalone (framework-neutral) version

For those of you who don’t use MooTools, a few small edits will allow you to use this code without relying on any outside JavaScript libraries. First, a verbose version explaining what’s happening:


function removeClass(el, classNames) {
   //Only run if the element is available and supports the className property
   if(el && el.className && classNames){
         //Replace all spaces in classNames with vertical beams
         var terms = classNames.replace(/s+/g, "|");
         //Create a regular expression using terms variable
         var reg = new RegExp('\b(' + terms + ')\b', 'g');
         //Use the new regular expression to replace all specified terms with a space
         var newClass = el.className.replace(reg, " ");
         //Use regular expression to remove extraneous whitespace between class names
         newClass = newClass.replace(/s+/g, " ");
         //Use regular expression to remove all whitespace at front and end of string
         newClass = newClass.replace(/^s+|s+$/g, "");
         //Set element's classname to new cleaned list of classes
         el.className = newClass;
   }
}

The concise version:


function removeClass(el, classNames) {
   if(el && el.className && classNames){
      el.className = el.className.replace(new RegExp("\b(" + classNames.replace(/s+/g, "|") + ")\b", "g"), " ").replace(/s+/g, " ").replace(/^s+|s+$/g, "");
   }
}

Used as follows:


var myelement = document.getElementById("myelement");
removeClass(myelement, "one three");
//<div id="myelement" class="one two three"></div>
//becomes
//<div id="myelement" class="two"></div>

Enjoy!

Successfully tested in Internet Explorer 6 (WinXP), Firefox 3.5 (WinXP), Firefox 3.6 (OS X 10.6.2), Safari 4 (OS X 10.6.2), Opera 10.1 (OS X 10.6.2), Chrome 5 (OS X 10.6.2)

CustomInput Class: Accessible, Custom-Styled Checkboxes and Radio Buttons

I’m a big fan of the Filament Group’s UI work.  They put a lot of thought into their work, and ensure everything they make is not only beautiful, but as accessible and as semantic as possible.

One of my favorite pieces of work by the Filament Group is their approach to stylized checkbox and radio <input> elements, as described in their post Accessible, Custom Designed Checkbox and Radio Button Inputs Styled with CSS (and a dash of jQuery)

The system is remarkably well-constructed, degrades gracefully, and is completely accessible if JavaScript, image loading, or CSS is disabled can’t be loaded. No small feat. Plus it remains semantically sound, with no bloated markup.

Having said all that, I’ve never actually used any of Filment Group’s UI code in my projects because of one little obstacle: they rely on jQuery.  Mind you, I’m not a jQuery hater, but I prefer MooTools and build all my major projects using MooTools. Switching to jQuery for such a small UI customization is not going to happen. I’ve often thought it would be great to build a MooTools version of Filament’s UI examples, but never had the time… until today.

I’m currently working on a new quiz system at work, and decided I’d incorporate Filament’s wonderful stylized checkboxes and radio buttons into my project, which meant it was time to roll up my sleeves and code me some Moo. 

View Demo

I made a couple of changes to the underlying JavaScript to suit a MooTools approach (and add some flexibility with the CSS selectors) but the basic premise is the same as Filament’s demo.

The following JavaScript will style ALL checkbox and radio inputs on your page. Note that CustomInput returns the collection of elements that have been styled.


window.addEvent("domready", function(){ 
    var all_styled_inputs = new CustomInput();
});

If you want to target specific parts of the page or only certain input types, pass a CSS selector as an argument:


window.addEvent("domready", function(){
    //Only style checkboxes
    var styled_checkboxes = new CustomInput("input[type='checkbox']");

    //Only style radios in a div named "walkman"
    var styled_radios = new CustomInput("#walkman input[type='radio']");
});

The CustomInput class has been fully JSLinted, and remains very close to the original jQuery version’s size. When compressed (YUI), it squeezes down to about 1.6kb. It uses ‘dollar-safe’ mode for compatibility with other JS libraries.

It has been successfully tested in the following systems:

Windows XP

  • Internet Explorer 6
  • Firefox 3.5
  • Safari 4
  • Chrome 4
  • Opera 10

Mac OS X (10.6.2)

  • Firefox 3.6
  • Safari 4
  • Opera 10.1
  • Chrome 5 (beta)

View Demo | Download Project Files

Major kudos to Filament Group for sharing their ideas with the world.

Update 3/12/2010: Fixed a typo in the JS file preventing the checkedHover class from being assigned.

Viewing PDFs in a Browser on a Mac

As a Mac user, one of the more annoying issues I frequently encounter is funky PDF handling in Firefox and Safari. For instance:

  • Adobe doesn’t make a version of Adobe Reader that’s compatible with Firefox on Mac OS X
  • Adobe Reader is only supported in 32-bit versions of Safari on OS X (Snow Leopard ships with a 64-bit version of Safari)
  • Safari has built-in handling of PDFs, but if Adobe Reader is installed — whether it’s actually working in Safari or not — it will turn off Safari’s native PDF handling by default.

Here are some things you can do to get PDFs to display in your browser(s).

Restore Safari’s built-in PDF handling

If your Safari browser isn’t using OS X’s native PDF handling, Adobe Reader may be overriding it. Here’s how to fix it:

  1. Launch Adobe Reader
  2. Go to Preferences > Internet
  3. Deselect “Display PDF in browser using…”
  4. Click OK

Enable PDF support in Firefox

Mozilla has a handy reference for this topic.  Here’s what they say:

Adobe does not yet maintain a plugin for viewing PDF files within Firefox for computers with Mac OS X. To view PDFs in Firefox:

I’ve installed the Firefox PDF Plugin on my Mac (Firefox 3.6), and it works great. It uses the Mac’s built-in PDF handling, so it’s a very small plugin runs very quick.

Caveats and an editorial

Using the Mac’s built-in PDF support means you won’t be able to take advantage of some of Adobe Reader’s new features, such as scripting, portfolios, and SWF support.

I don’t know about you, but I prefer to use the PDF format for its traditional purpose: reading print-based documents online.  Plus, Adobe Reader currently requires 290MB of space on the hard drive. I can live without the new features and would prefer to use my 290MB of space for other things.

In general, I recommend avoiding Adobe Reader on a Mac because of its poor support in Firefox and Safari, its incredible bloat, and the seemingly daily announcements of major security vulnerabilities. Most of the security issues have been directly related to the scripting functionality and other new features. If a lite version of Adobe Reader were offered — one that removes the bloat, eschews these new features, and simply lets us view standard PDF documents — I’d be more than happy to use it.

Shameless plug

Need to embed a PDF in an HTML page? Try PDFObject. It’s free, tiny, and works much like SWFObject (the two projects are unrelated).

Speaking of IMS…

IMS produces standards they want everyone to use.

Why, then, do I have to log in to their site in order to VIEW the documentation for their standards?

Situation: I found a link to a PDF on their site. When I clicked it, I was presented with this warm greeting [link no longer available]:

Sorry
The page you are trying to access is reserved for participants in the IMS GLC Public Community or is reserved for IMS GLC Members, Affiliates or Alliance Members.

If you have already set up an account and just need to login, please do so here. If you would like to register for a free public community account, just head on over to our registration page.

So… in order for me to even read their standards, I have to tell them who I am and put my personal information in their database? How does this foster adoption of standards?

Geez these guys burn my britches…

UPDATE:

The IMS site requires the following information before you can view any of their documentation: Name, email, organization name, job title, job description, country

Pretty invasive if you ask me.

UPDATE #2:

After registering for site access, I was greeted with a second page asking for persona information, and asking me to agree to IMS’s licensing terms. They require the following information: Name, email, “entity on whose behalf you are accepting this agreement”, street address (includes city, zip, country), phone number

(Phone number? Seriously?)

The license terms are FIVE PAGES long after pasting into a Word file.

Interesting bits (emphasis mine):

IMS specifications are published solely for the purpose of enabling interoperability among learning products and services used by the education and training communities served by IMS members and are made available under license to Registered Users solely to further that purpose.

I guess this means the standards aren’t meant for public consumption after all, though the end result of the standards are?

Users of the Specification(s) are encouraged to engage directly with IMS as IMS members, including registration of all applications of specifications, in order to enhance the level of interoperability in the education and training industries worldwide.

I read this as: tell us who you are and how you’re using IMS specifications so we can include you in our next press release (you know, the part where we pat ourselves on the back).

Any use of the Specifications(s) or other Materials provided by IMS must be accompanied by the copyright legends provided with full attribution given to IMS.

If this were the case with the HTML, ECMAScript, or XML standards, our documents would be bloated with useless attribution credits. (Side note: I wonder how this affects SCORM, as SCORM uses IMS specifications for packaging? Is anyone who produces a SCORM-based course supposed to pay respect to the Don provide attribution to IMS in their courseware?)

Licensee agrees to publicly and visibly acknowledge and attribute to IMS the Specification(s) upon which products are based to any and all Development Partner(s).

So if Company X uses an IMS specification, they’re supposed to go over to each “Development Partner” — many of whom may be commercial competitors — and let them know?

IMS issues press release for new e-learning interoperability standards

News from the IMS Global Learning Consortium:

The IMS Global Learning Consortium (IMS GLC) today announced the public review of the first phase of the Learning Tools Interoperability (LTI) standards to allow open and seamless integration of educational web applications. Called “Basic LTI or BLTI,” this first standard addresses the most common roadblocks to achieving a seamless experience for teachers and students.

Reading this press release, I couldn’t help but notice two things:

  1. There’s an awful lot of chest-puffing and self-congratulation going on here — people’s credentials are thrown around an awful lot, and over half of the press release is filled “Statements of Support.”
  2. There’s no hyperlink to the standards that are being announced, nor is there any information about how you can read the new standard proposal, whether you can try it yourself, how long it’s open for review, etc.

If the new standards are written as poorly as this press release, it’s going to be 1,000 pages of useless spec. All filler, no killer.

Introducing LearnSWFObject.com

I’m happy to introduce you to my latest project, LearnSWFObject.com

It’s been many, many months in the making, and has rudely been put aside a number of times when my life left me no free time to work on it. Happily, I’ve been able to push through the last remaining barriers and get the site out the door. Hopefully someone will find it useful.

I’ve ported my most popular SWFObject tutorials and examples to the new site — updated, of course — and have added a few new tutorials, too. As part of the housecleaning effort, I’ve removed all SWFObject examples and tutorials from pipwerks.com. 301 redirects will re-route the most popular posts to their LearnSWFObject.com equivalent, but the odds and ends have been sent to the compost heap.

I’m most excited about the brand-new code generator (written from scratch) that will write your SWFObject embed code for you. Some notes about the generator:

  • It can write HTML 5, HTML 4 (transitional/strict), and XHTML 1 (transitional/strict) doctypes
  • It provides code for both types of SWFObject embeds: dynamic (JavaScript) and static (markup)
  • It includes a download link that lets you save your generated markup in an HTML file
  • The static publishing option includes an option for a nice, shorter syntax
  • The generator uses progressive enhancement techniques, meaning it’s nicer with JavaScript enabled but fully functional without it

Give it a try!

LearnSWFObject.com will remain a work in progress, as SWFObject itself continues to evolve and people find news ways to break use it in their sites. I will continue to play with the formatting and layout from time to time.

In other SWFObject news, I think I’m allowed to report that SWFObject 2.3 is in the works, and will contain mostly bug fixes and an enhancement or two. Bug reports and feature requests are always welcome at SWFObject’s Google Code site. If you have questions about how to use SWFObject that aren’t answered by the LearnSWFObject.com tutorials, please post them on the SWFObject Google Group.

Not so crazy about Moodle? Try Chamilo

Moodle, Moodle, Moodle. It’s popular. It has helped many people quickly set up their company’s web-based training. But truth be told, it doesn’t really do much for me. I have never found it fun or sexy or even intuitive. I imagine many people feel that way. So what’s Moodle got going for it, then? It’s FREE, it’s easy to set up, and there’s a thriving development community behind it that can help you when you get stuck.

Well, in case you didn’t know, there’s another game in town by the name of Dokeos. It’s not as well known in North America, but it’s huge in other countries. Dokeos mirrors Moodle in many ways: it’s easy to set up, uses the same technology (PHP/MySQL), is open-source, and has a very large developer community. Dokeos has a much different look and feel than Moodle, which I find a little cleaner and easier to use. (Disclaimer: I test drove Dokeos over a year ago and haven’t tried the latest versions)

But there’s trouble brewing in Dokeosland. Apparently there were significant differences of opinion regarding the future of Dokeos, prompting Yannick Warnier (the lead developer) as well as the entire development staff to leave the Dokeos project [link no longer available]. While this is probably very disconcerting to Dokeos users, Yannick and the former Dokeos developers are not leaving anyone hanging… they’ve forked Dokeos’ open-source code and used it to create a new LMS named Chamilo. It’s basically Dokeos under-the-hood, but with newer features and a new direction. They’re dedicated to the notion of open-source software, and are ensuring Chamilo stays open.

I highly recommend giving Chamilo a spin. I’m looking forward to trying it myself.

Side note: if you’re looking for more alternatives to Moodle, you can also try Ilias. It’s pretty nice, too.

Fear of sharing, fear of failing

Janet Clarey posted a link to a great blog post by Rajesh Setty entitled Why some smart people are reluctant to share? Setty’s insights resound with me, not because I think I’m smart — quite the opposite, actually — but because the more I learn, the more I’m aware of my limitations.

Setty tried to determine why “smart people” are often reluctant to share their knowledge with others. His conclusion was:

Smart people want to give their best and as they learn more, they learn that they need to learn a lot more before they start sharing. They learn some more and they learn they need to learn some more. What they forget is that most of the expertise that they already have is either becoming “obvious” to them or better yet, going into their “background thinking.”

I agree with the points in Setty’s post completely, except in I’d substitute the word “experienced” for “smart.”

Setty’s line “Smart people want to give their best” seems to be something of a passing thought in his post. I’d like to give it more attention, because I believe conscientious experienced folks have a fear of giving bad advice.

Zeldman had it right when he said “If your old work doesn’t shame you, you’re not growing.” Experienced people look back at their younger, inexperienced self and either chuckle at their own gumption or get rosy-cheeked from embarrassment. I’m more of the rosy-cheeked guy. My old work shames me all the time, and it often causes me to hesitate when sharing my work or giving advice to others.

This may sound funny to some of you… anyone who follows this blog probably knows I spend a lot of time doling out technical advice via places like the SWFObject and eLearning Technology and Development Google Groups.  The truth is, I question myself in almost each and every post I write. Why? Because I’m experienced enough to know that maybe I shouldn’t be so quick and cocky with an answer. Maybe there’s a different solution I haven’t heard of. To paraphrase Setty, maybe I need to learn more first.

So why do I even try to give advice if I have a fear of giving bad advice? Because I want to learn more. I often find that helping others is the best way to teach myself. I’ve learned a ton through helping others, and find it rewarding in many ways. Except when I’m wrong, and then it plain sucks.