The IMS Global Learning Consortium needs to loosen up!

I looked up the QTI specs on the IMS site and couldn’t believe the boldfaced notice I saw on the page: “HTML documents may be viewed online, but may not be printed without permission” (emphasis added).

Can you believe that? IMS is in the business of creating standards they want the whole world to use. These standards should be open, easily accessible and free from licensing constraints. Why on earth do they want to put silly notices like this on their site?

HTML 5: The strong element

I just saw something interesting I thought I’d pass along. In the new HTML 5 proposal, the strong element is being modified to represent “importance rather than strong emphasis.” The WHATWG gives the following example: <strong>Warning.</strong> This dungeon is dangerous. <strong>Avoid the ducks.</strong> Take any gold you find. <strong><strong>Do not take any of the diamonds</strong>, … Continue reading “HTML 5: The strong element”

Building e-learning courses: Should we use e-learning authoring tools?

Buckle your seatbelts, you may not like this statement: Most e-learning tools do not promote the creation of effective courses, do not promote web standards, and do not promote accessibility; they merely make cookie-cutter course development easier for technically inexperienced course developers.

There, I’ve said it. Please don’t hate me.