Using Scraper on RetroPie

RetroPie is a fun little arcade system that runs on Raspberry Pi. It includes Emulation Station, which allows the user to select games using a USB game pad or joystick instead of a keyboard. One of Emulation Station’s features is a scraper, which analyzes your library of game ROMs and tries to download the appropriate … Continue reading “Using Scraper on RetroPie”

PDFObject 2.0 released

After almost eight years in the making (and nearly 7 years of procrastinating), PDFObject 2.0 has arrived. PDFObject is an open-source standards-friendly JavaScript utility for embedding PDF files into HTML documents. It’s like SWFObject, but for PDFs. Version 1.0 was released in 2008 and has enjoyed modest success. Based on stats from PDFObject.com (including devious hot-linkers) and integration … Continue reading “PDFObject 2.0 released”

Convert “localhost” to your Mac’s current IP address

When developing web pages, I use my Mac’s built-in Apache or MAMP.app. Viewing the page means using an address such as http://localhost/mypage.html. I decided to make my life a little easier by writing an AppleScript that looks at the open tabs in Chrome and Safari then replaces “localhost” (or custom domain) with my current IP address. Saving this as a service enables me to go to Chrome > Services to run the script.

I guess there’s no such thing as a secure PDF

I was reading the SCORM 1.2 reference docs today. I wanted to copy a passage for my notes, but the PDF is password-protected and prevents anyone from copying text. (REALLY irritating, considering the ADL is a quasi-government organization and the docs should be open to all.) What to do? Well, turns out there are at … Continue reading “I guess there’s no such thing as a secure PDF”

iTunes, TV Shows and Apple TV

iTunes vexes me. For better or for worse, we’re an Apple household and own an Apple TV, so I’m kind of stuck with iTunes for managing my media files.

My wife and I have also purchased a significant amount of DVDs over the years, which I ripped to iTunes using the trusty old Handbrake (love you, Handbrake!). These DVDs include a lot of TV shows, such as Doctor Who and Magnum PI.

My workflow has always been: rip via Handbrake, then import into iTunes by dragging the m4v files onto the iTunes window. By default, the TV shows don’t have any metadata (no proper titles, descriptions, episode numbers, or artwork), and iTunes automatically files them under Movies. This means they’ll show up in Apple TV with no description, no preview picture (such as DVD box art), and no sequence information.

Setting OS X Desktop Picture Based on Time of Day

I recently changed jobs (Hello, FireEye!) and was issued a new MacBook Air. I spend a lot of time looking at the screen and was getting bored with the supplied desktop pictures. I also start work very early most days (7am-ish), and thought it would be nice to have a desktop picture that matches the … Continue reading “Setting OS X Desktop Picture Based on Time of Day”